Next recording will be available on Friday, August 14, at 6 pm.

Florence Price
Symphony No. 3 in C minor
Performed at the Paramount Theatre on Friday, January 25, 2019

Music Director Michael Morgan introduces Florence Price Symphony No. 3

Florence Price Symphony No. 3.  Florence Price was an African-American composer who lived  from 1887 to 1953. Her First Symphony was the first work by an African-American woman to be played by a major American orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, in 1933.  She is now seeing a great rediscovery and for me her Third Symphony is her masterpiece.  It is in four movements – classical in form, but American in outlook – with the melodiousness of American folk music, and the extended harmonies we have come to associate with jazz, though she most definitely was not a jazz musician.  Written in 1940, here is Florence Price’s Third Symphony from a January 2019 performance of the Oakland Symphony. Concert Program

 

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Anton Bruckner
Te Deum

Hope Briggssoprano
Betany Coffland, mezzo-soprano
Amitai Patitenor
Anthony Reed, bass
Oakland Symphony Chorus, Dr. Lynne Morrow, director
Saint Mary’s College Chamber Singers & Glee Club, Dr. Julie Ford, director

Performed at the Paramount Theatre on Friday, March 31, 2017

Music Director Michael Morgan introduces Anton Bruckner Te Deum

Anton Bruckner’s Te Deum, from a concert in March of 2017. Bruckner was an organist and devoted church musician, and Te Deum is from the incipit “Te Deum laudamus,” which can be translated “Thee, O God, we praise.” It is in five sections, performed without pause and features vocal soloists (led by a radiant Hope Briggs) and our Oakland Symphony Chorus, which is led by Dr. Lynne Morrow. On this occasion, our chorus is joined by the chorus of St. Mary’s College, with whom we were very happy to collaborate. The Oakland Symphony Chorus is an essential part of our Oakland Symphony family and we’re proud to present them in Bruckner’s Te Deum. Concert Program

 

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Victor Bendix 

Symphony No. 3 in A minor, Op. 25
Performed at the Paramount Theatre on Friday, November 13, 2015

Music Director Michael Morgan introduces Victor Bendix Symphony No. 3

Victor Bendix, who lived from 1851 to 1926, was the first composer we played in our “Lost Romantics” Series. Pieces from the romantic era that have fallen out of the repertory for reasons that I couldn’t explain. Bendix was a Danish/Jewish composer, which could somewhat account for his music getting lost during the World War Two period. This Symphony is in three movements, full of melodic and harmonic inventiveness. I particularly call to your attention the second subject of the first movement about four minutes in. At that point, any doubts are cast aside and you are all in. Dating from 1895, here is the Third Symphony of Victor Bendix from a November 2015 performance by the Oakland Symphony. Concert Program

Oakland Symphony revives a forgotten gem. Concert review by Joshua Kosman (11/14/2015) 

 

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Louise Farrenc

Symphony No. 3 in G minor, Op. 36
Performed at the Paramount Theatre on Friday, March 22, 2019

Music Director Michael Morgan introduces Louise Farrenc Symphony No. 3

Louise Farrenc Symphony No. 3,  from a March 2019 performance of the Oakland Symphony.   Over the years, we’ve played a series of pieces we’ve called “Lost Romantics.”  These are pieces from the Romantic period –  in the case of Louise Farrenc, early Romantic period – that I believe have unjustly fallen out of the regular concert repertory.   I’ve heard Louise Farrenc described as “criminally underplayed” and I agree.  A revered teacher and performer at the Paris Conservatory, it is said that on the success of this symphony she demanded and finally got pay that was equal to her male colleagues.   Here is the excellent Symphony No. 3 by Louise Farrenc written in 1847. Concert Program

 

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Gustav Mahler
Symphony No. 4 in G major
Elena Galván, Soprano
Performed at the Paramount Theatre on Saturday, February 22, 2020

Music Director Michael Morgan introduces Mahler’s Fourth Symphony

“Mahler’s Symphony Number Four – the smallest of the Mahler symphonies in terms of orchestral forces and the shortest in length, it is also for many their favorite Mahler symphony. This concert was given in co-operation with the Violins of Hope, a collection of string instruments played in the concentration camps during the Holocaust, and now restored and touring the world as a collection. Several are being played in the orchestra, as well as one of the solo violins used in the second movement, the unusual sound of which is the result of a special higher tuning of the strings. The violin soloist is co-concertmaster Dawn Harms. The soprano soloist in the last movement, singing of the heavenly life with all its beauty and bounty, is Elena Galván. Here then is Mahler’s Symphony Number Four from a February 2020 concert by the Oakland Symphony.“ Concert Program

 

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